Hardware history

It is normal that old hardware is casted out of the desk some day. But it’s also noticeable to review this modernization progress over multiple years and see what systems you had in this period.

I started maintaining a list of systems I had in the last years – time for a short road to IT nostalgia:

Old hardware

Desktops

  • ESCOM Desktop
  • AMD 486DX @ 66 Mhz, later Pentium @ 120 Mhz
  • 14″ CRT @ 800x600x16
  • 16 MB EDO RAM, later 64 MB EDO RAM
  • 900 MB IDE HDD, later 2.1 GB
  • later Creative Soundblaster AWE64 and CD-ROM
  • MS-DOS 5.0, MS-DOS 6.22, Windows 3.1, Windows 95, Windows 98 SE
  • 1993 – 2000
  • Noname Race 286
  • Intel 80286 @ 25 Mhz
  • 4 MB EDO RAM
  • 12″ CRT @ 640x480x16
  • 500 MB IDE HDD
  • Floppy
  • later Creative Soundblaster 16
  • MS-DOS 6.22 and Windows for Workgroups 3.11
  • 1997 – 2001
kein Bild
  • Medion MD2000
  • Intel Pentium 3 @ 667 Mhz (stepped down by 1 Mhz later)
  • 17″ CRT-Display @ 1024x768x32
  • 128 MB SD-RAM (later 512 MB)
  • 20 GB IDE HDD
  • Soundblaster 128 PCI
  • 32 MB Nvidia TNT2 Pro
  • Creatix V90 HaM 56k PCI-Modem and later also WLAN card
  • Windows 98 SE, Windows XP Home, SuSE Professional 7.2
  • 2000 – 2005 (broken mainboard)
  • Medion MD 3000
  • Intel Pentium 4 @ 1.8 Ghz
  • 15″ TFT-Display @ 1024x768x32
  • Nvidia GeForce3 Ti200 with 64 MB
  • 256 MB RAM (later 768 MB)
  • 80 GB IDE HDD (later 160 GB)
  • Floppy and CD burner
  • Modem and Fast-Ethernet
  • Windows XP Home, SuSE Professional 7.2
  • 2001 – 2005
kein Bild
  • Medion Titanium MD 8080 XL
  • Intel Pentium 4 @ 3.0 Ghz
  • 512 MB DDR RAM (later 1.5 GB)
  • 160 GB IDE HDD (later 500 GB)
  • TV/radio card, sound card, modem, card rfeader, WLAN
  • ATI Radeon 9800 XL with 128 MB RAM
  • DVD-ROM and DVD burner
  • Windows XP Home, Ubuntu 5.10/8.10/9.04
  • 2003 – 2009
  • Peacock Tower
  • Intel Pentium MMX @ 200 Mhz
  • 32 MB EDO RAM
  • 4.3 GB Quantum Bigfoot IDE HDD
  • Windows 95B, DeLi Linux
  • 2006 – 2008
  • Noname Tower
  • Intel Pentium 3 Katmai @ 450 Mhz
  • 256 MB SD-RAM
  • 30 GB IDE HDD
  • Windows 2000 SP4, ArchLinux
  • 2007 – 2009
  • D.I.Y. “P4
  • Intel Pentium 4 @ 2 Ghz
  • 512 MB RAM
  • 3x IBM DCHS 4 GB SCSI HDDs
  • CD-ROM, network card
  • Ubuntu 8.10
  • 2007 – 2009
  • Noname Tower
  • Intel Pentium 4 @ 2.0 Ghz
  • 512 MB DDR RAM
  • 320 GB SATA HDD
  • Dawicontrol DW-150 SATA controller
  • Ubuntu 8.10
  • 2008 – 2009
  • Eigenbau-PC “Sempron
  • AMD Sempron 2800 @ 1.6 Ghz
  • 1 GB RAM
  • 40 GB IDE HDD
  • 32 MB ATI graphic card
  • DVD burner
  • Gigabit-Ethernet and WLAN
  • Nvidia GeForce 6600 GT
  • Windows XP Home, SuSE Professional, Ubuntu 5.10/8.10/9.04
  • 2008- 2010
  • Eigenbau-PC “Core2Duo
  • Intel Pentium Core2Duo E6600
  • 2 GB RAM
  • 250 GB SATA HDD (later 320 GB)
  • 512 MB GeForce 8600GTS
  • DVD burner
  • Gigabit-Ethernet and WLAN
  • Windows XP Professional, Windows Vista, Ubuntu 8.10/9.04
  • 2008 – 2010
  • IBM ThinkCentre M52 Workstation
  • Small Form Factor
  • Intel Celeron D @ 2.77 Ghz (64-bit)
  • 512 MB DDR2 RAM
  • 40 GB SATA HDD
  • Windows XP Professional, Ubuntu 9.04
  • 2009 – 2009
Mac Mini (Mid-2011)
  • Apple Mac Mini
  • Intel Core i5-2410M “Sandy-Bridge” @ 2.3 Ghz
  • 8 GB DDR3 RAM (PC-1333)
  • 500 GB SATA HDD, later 160 GB SSD
  • Intel HD Graphics 3000
  • Sound card, speaker, Thunderbolt, HDMI
  • Gigabit Ethernet, n-Draft WLAN, Bluetooth 4.0
  • Apple Mac OS X 10.7.4
  • 2012 – 2013

Notebooks

  • Medion Titanium MD6200
  • Intel Pentium 4 @ 2.6 Ghz
  • 15″ display @ 1024x768x32
  • 512 MB DDR RAM (PC333)
  • 40 GB IDE HDD
  • 64 MB Nvidia GeForce Go 5200
  • Sound card, PCMCIA and Modem
  • Fast-Ethernet and WLAN with WEP (no WPA possible!)
  • CD-RW+DVD-ROM Combo
  • Windows XP Home, Ubuntu 5.10
  • 2003 – 2006 (broken mainboard 1 day after warranty end)
  • Toshiba Satellite Pro 4360
  • Intel Pentium 3 @ 700 Mhz
  • 14.1″ display @ 1024x768x32
  • 256 MB SD-RAM
  • 20 GB IDE HDD
  • Sound card, PCMCIA and Modem
  • Docking station
  • Windows XP Home, Ubuntu 8.10
  • 2006 – 2009
  • IBM Thinkpad 760L
  • Intel Pentium @ 90 Mhz
  • 10.4″ display @ 640x480x16
  • 24 MB EDO RAM
  • 2.1 GB IDE HDD (former 900 MB)
  • Floppy, sound card, PCMCIA and Modem
  • CRUX Linux 2.4 and Windows 95B
  • 2008 – 2008
  • Toshiba Satellite 300CDT
  • Intel Pentium I @ 166 Mhz
  • 12.1″ display @ 800x600x16
  • 64 MB RAM
  • 10 GB IDE HDD
  • Floppy and CD-ROM
  • Sound card, PCMCIA and Modem
  • CRUX Linux 2.4 and Windows 98 SE
  • 2008 – 2009
  • IBM Thinkpad X21
  • Intel Pentium 3 @ 700 Mhz
  • 12.1″ display @ 1024x768x32
  • 256 MB SD-RAM
  • 20 GB IDE HDD
  • Sound card, PCMCIA and Modem
  • Windows XP Professional
  • 2009 – 2009
  • IBM Thinkpad T42
  • Intel Pentium D Mobile @ 1.5 Ghz
  • 14.1″ display @ 1024x768x32
  • 1 GB DDR RAM
  • 40 GB IDE HDD
  • 32 MB ATI Radeon 7500
  • DVD-ROM drive
  • PCMCIA, IrDa
  • Gigabit-Ethernet and a/b/g-WLAN (54 Mbit/s)
  • Windows XP Professional, Windows 7 Beta, Ubuntu 8.10/9.04
  • 2008 – 2009
  • IBM Thinkpad T41
  • Intel Pentium D Mobile @ 1.6 Ghz
  • 14.1″ display @ 1024x768x32
  • 1 GB DDR RAM
  • 40 GB IDE HDD
  • 32 MB ATI graphic card
  • DVD-ROM Laufwerk
  • PCMCIA, IrDa
  • Gigabit-Ethernet and a/b/g-WLAN
  • Windows XP Professional, Ubuntu 8.10/9.04
  • 2008 – 2009
  • Lenovo Thinkpad X41 Tablet (X41T)
  • Intel Pentium M @ 1.6 Ghz
  • 12.1″ display @ 1024x768x32
  • 3.5 GB DDR2 RAM
  • 32 GB SSD (former 60 GB IDE HDD)
  • Intel Graphics Media Accelerator 900
  • Bluetooth, IrDa and PCMCIA
  • Gigabit-Ethernet and a/b/g-WLAN (54 Mbit/s)
  • Windows XP Professional, XP Tablet PC Edition, Vista, 7 Beta, Ubuntu 9.10
  • 2009 – 2011
  • Toshiba Libretto 100CT
  • Intel Pentium MMX @ 166 Mhz
  • 32 MB EDO RAM
  • 20 GB IDE HDD
  • 7.1″ display @ 800x480x16
  • Sound card, VGA, USB 1.1, PCMCIA
  • Docking station and WLAN-Karte
  • CRUX Linux 2.5 and Windows 98
  • 2011 – 2011
  • Lenovo Thinkpad R500
  • Intel Core2Duo @ 2×2.53 Ghz
  • 15.4″ display @ 1680×1050
  • 8 GB DDR3 RAM (former 4 GB)
  • 60 GB SSD + 640 GB HDD
  • Windows 7 Professional x64
  • 2009 – 2012
  • Lenovo Thinkpad X200
  • Intel Core2Duo @ 2×2.4 Ghz
  • 12″ display @ 1280×800
  • 8 GB DDR3 RAM (former 2 GB)
  • 640 GB SATA HDD (former 160 GB)
  • Windows 7 Professional x64
  • 2010 – 2012 Displayschaden
  • Lenovo Thinkpad X230
  • Intel Core i5-3320M “Ivy-Bridge” @ 2.6 Ghz
  • 12.5″ display @ 1366x768x32
  • 8 GB DDR3 RAM (PC-1333)
  • 120 GB SSD + 640 GB SATA HDD @ 7200 RPM
  • Intel HD4000
  • Sound card, PCI-Express, USB 3.0
  • Gigabit Ethernet, Bluetooth 4.0, WLAN n-Draft
  • Windows 8.1 Professional x64
  • 2012 – 2013 Review
X230
Thinkpad T420s
  • Lenovo Thinkpad T420s
  • Intel Core i7-2640M “Sandy-Bridge” @ 2.8 Ghz
  • 14.1″ display @ 1600x900x32
  • 8 GB DDR3 RAM (PC-1333)
  • 160 GB SSD + 640 GB SATA HDD @ 7200 RPM
  • Intel HD4000 + 1 GB Nvidia NVS 4200M (Optimus)
  • Sound card, PCI-Express, USB 3.0
  • Gigabit Ethernet, Bluetooth 3.0, UMTS, WLAN n-Draft
  • Windows 8.1 Professional x64
  • 2012 – 2014 Review

Server

  • Peacock Procida TSP
  • 2x Intel Pentium III @ 1 Ghz
  • 1 GB ECC SD-RAM
  • 5x 80 GB SCSI HDDs
  • Floppy and CD-ROM
  • ICP Vortex SCSI RAID controller with 64 MB ECC RAM
  • Ubuntu 6.06 LTS
  • 2006 – 2009
  • Siemens Pentium Pro
  • Intel Pentium Pro @ 200 Mhz (real i686)
  • 96 MB EDO RAM
  • 13 GB IDE HDD
  • CRUX Linux 2.4 with Apache2 and PHP4, CUPS
  • 2008 – 2010
  • HP ProLiant DL380 G3
  • 2x Intel Xeon @ 3.2 Ghz
  • 6 GB DDR ECC RAM
  • 4x 18 GB SCSI HDDs
  • SCSI U160-Controller and 2 Gigabit NICs
  • VMware ESXi 3.5
  • 2008 – 2010
  • SUN Fire V240
  • 2x UltraSPARC IIIi @ 1 Ghz
  • 2 GB DDR ECC RAM
  • 4x 18.2 GB SCSI HDDs
  • Debian Etch (We have joy, we have fun – we have Linux on our SUN!)
  • 2008 – 2011
  • SUN 280R
  • 2x UltraSPARC III @ 900 Mhz
  • 2 GB DDR ECC RAM
  • 2x 72 GB FC-AL SCSI HDDs
  • RSC card with built-in modem for remote access
  • Debian Etch (you know…)
  • 2008 – 2011
  • IBM ThinkCentre S50 “web server
  • Intel Pentium 4 @ 2.8 Ghz
  • 512 MB DDR RAM
  • 40 GB IDE HDD
  • Floppy, CD-ROM, Sound card, PCI and AGP
  • Debian Lenny
  • 2009 – 2010
  • HP ProLiant DL140 G1
  • 2x Intel Xeon @ 2.4 Ghz
  • 4 GB DDR ECC RAM
  • 2x 80 GB SATA HDDs
  • VMware ESXi 3.5
  • 2010 – 2011
  • SUN Cobalt RaQ
  • QED MIPS 5230 @ 150 Mhz
  • 64 MB EDO RAM
  • 20 GB IDE HDD
  • 10 MBit DEC-NIC
  • RS232 port and front LCD panel with buttons
  • Debian Lenny
  • 2011 – 2011

Eigenbau-Hypervisor

  • D.I.Y. hypervisor
  • Tyan S8005 mainboard
  • 19″ Chenbr cCase
  • AMD Phenom X6 1090T Black-Edition 6-core @ 3.2 Ghz (6 MB cache)
  • 16 GB DDR3 ECC RAM
  • 16 GB SSD + 2x 500 GB SATA HDDs @ 7200 RPM
  • 2x Gigabit Ethernet + RS232 + USB 2.0
  • HP SmartArray P400 SAS-Controller
  • VMware ESXi 5.0
  • 2011 – 2012
  • HP C8000 Workstation
  • HP PA-RISC PA-8800 @ 1 Ghz (32 MB Cache)
  • 8 GB DDR2 ECC RAM
  • 72.8 GB SCSI HDD @ 10000 RPM
  • Gigabit Ethernet + RS232 + USB 1.1
  • PCI + PCI-X + sound card
  • ATI FireGL X3 with 2x DVI
  • HP-UX 11iv1 (11.11) – June 2004
  • 2012 – 2013 (broken mainboard)
  • HP Integrity RX2600
  • 2x Intel Itanium2 (Madison) @ 1.5 Ghz
  • 16 GB DDR2 ECC RAM
  • 3x 72.8 GB SCSI HDDs @ 15000 RPM
  • 2x Gigabit Ethernet + Management Processor
  • 4x USB 2.0 + 2x RS232 + 2x Fibre-Channel HBA
  • HP-UX 11iv3 (11.31) – March 2012 + OpenVMS 8.4
  • 2012 – 2013
  • SUN Blade 2500 Workstation
  • UltraSPARC IIIi @ 1.28 Ghz
  • 4 GB DDR ECC RAM
  • 2x 36 GB SCSI HDDs @ 10000 RPM
  • Gigabit Ethernet + RS232 + USB 2.0
  • PCI + PCI-X + sound card
  • XVR-600 graphic card with 64 MB memory
  • SUN Solaris 10 8/11
  • 2012 – 2013
Blade 2500
  • HP MicroServer N40L – “Test hypervisor
  • AMD Turion II Neo N40L @ 1.5 Ghz
  • 8 GB DDR3 RAM (PC-1333)
  • HP Smart Array P410 SAS controller with 256 MB Cache
  • 2x 500 GB SATA HDDs @ 7200 RPM
  • Gigabit Ethernet
  • VMware ESXi Beta
  • 2012 – 2015
  • HP C8000 Workstation
  • HP PA-RISC PA-8900 @ 1 Ghz (64 MB cache)
  • 8 GB DDR2 ECC RAM
  • 2x 72.8 GB SCSI HDDs @ 15000 RPM
  • Gigabit Ethernet + RS232 + USB 1.1
  • PCI + PCI-X + sound card
  • ATI FireGL X3 with 2x DVI
  • HP-UX 11iv1 (11.11) – June 2004
  • 2013 – 2014
  • D.I.Y. hypervisor
  • Lian-Li PC-V358B case
  • Supermicro X9SCM-F mainboard
  • Intel Xeon E3-1230 v1 @ 3.2 Ghz
  • 32 GB DDR3 RAM (PC-1333)
  • HP SmartArray P400 RAID controller with 512 MB Cache
  • LSI SAS3081E-R RAID controller for VMDirectPath I/O
  • 2x 1 TB SATA HDDs @ 7200 RPM
  • 80 GB Intel SSD read cache
  • 2x Gigabit Ethernet + IPMI
  • VMware ESXi 6.x
  • 2014 – 2016 Artikel
  • HP ProLiant MicroServer Gen8 – Test ESXi
  • Intel Celeron G1610T @ 2.3 Ghz
  • 16 GB DDR3 RAM (PC-1333)
  • HP SmartArray P410 RAID controller with 256 MB Cache
  • 2x 500 GB SATA HDDs @ 7200 RPM
  • 2x Gigabit Ethernet + IPMI
  • VMware ESXi 6.x
  • 2015 – 2016
  • D.I.Y. vSphere cluster (x2)
  • Inter-Tech IPC 2U-2098 case
  • ASUS P9D-M mainboard and ASMB7-IKVM Chip
  • Intel i3-4360T @ 3.2 Ghz
  • 32 GB DDR3 RAM (PC-1333)
  • 250 GB Samsung EVO 850 SSD (VSAN cache)
  • 480 GB OCZ Trion 150 (VSAN capacity)
  • Mellanox Connect-X 2 10G (VSAN Interconnect)
  • 2x Gigabit Ethernet + IPMI
  • VMware ESXi 6.x
  • 2016 – 2017 Artikel

NAS

  • Fujitsu-Siemens D1171
  • 2x Intel Pentium 3 @ 1 Ghz
  • 512 MB SD-RAM
  • 2x 250 GB SATA HDDs
  • Dawicontrol DC-150 SATA controller
  • Windows Server 2000, Windows Server 2003
  • 2007 – 2009
  • D.I.Y. NAS
  • AMD 64 X2 4200+ EE
  • 2 GB DDR2 RAM
  • 1 TB SATA HDD, SATA backplane and DDS2 streamer
  • IPC case with EBM-Papst fan
  • Debian Sarge
  • 2009 – 2010
  • QNAP TS-509 Pro
  • Intel Celeron @ 1.6 Ghz
  • 1 GB DDR2 RAM
  • 3x 1 TB SATA HDDs
  • 2010 (sold because of missing functionality)
  • QNAP TS-639 Pro
  • Intel Atom N270 @ 1.6 Ghz
  • 1 GB DDR2 RAM
  • 3x 1 TB SATA HDDs
  • 2010 (sold because of missing functionality)
  • D.I.Y. NAS
  • 19″ Chenbro case with 3WARE backplane
  • 8 GB SSD with Debian Squeeze
  • 6x 1 TB im RAID-5
  • Adaptec SCSI controller for tape loader and LTO drive
  • Debian Lenny, Debian Squeeze
  • 2010 – 2012
  • HP MicroServer N36L – “NAS
  • AMD Turion II Neo N36L @ 1.3 Ghz
  • 2 GB DDR3 RAM (PC-1333)
  • 4x 2 TB SATA HDDs @ 5400 RPM
  • Gigabit Ethernet + Remote Access Card
  • CentOS 6.5 x86_64
  • 2012 – 2014

Mobile

  • Nokia N900
  • Cortex A8 @ 600 Mhz
  • 256 MB RAM
  • 32 GB Flash
  • WLAN + HSDPA + Bluetooth
  • Maemo 5 (Debian GNU/Linux)
  • 2010 – 2011
  • HTC Desire HD
  • Qualcomm Snapdragon S2 @ 1 Ghz
  • 768 MB RAM
  • 1,5 GB ROM + 16 GB SDHC
  • WLAN n-Draft + HSDPA + Bluetooth
  • Android 4.0.4 Sabsa Prime 8.5
  • 2011 – 2012 article
Desire HD
Thinkpad Tablet
  • Lenovo Thinkpad Tablet
  • NVidia Tegra 2 @ 1 Ghz
  • 1 GB RAM
  • 32 GB Flash + 16 GB SDHC Class-10
  • WLAN n-Draft + Bluetooth + HDMI + USB 2.0
  • Android 4.0.3
  • 2012 – 2013
  • HTC Sensation
  • Dual-Core Qualcomm Scorpion @ 1.2 Ghz
  • 768 MB RAM
  • 3 GB ROM + 16 GB SDHC
  • WLAN n-Draft + HSDPA + Bluetooth
  • Android 4.0.4 SmartDroid
  • 2012 – 2013 review
Sensation
Nexus 7
  • Google Nexus 7
  • 7″ touchscreen with 1280×720 resolution
  • NVidia Tegra 3 @ 1.3 Ghz
  • 1 GB RAM
  • 32 GB Flash
  • WLAN n-Draft + Bluetooth
  • Android 5
  • 2013 – 2015
  • Oppo Find 5
  • Qualcomm APQ8064 @ 1.5 Ghz
  • 2 GB RAM
  • 32 GB Flash
  • WLAN n-Draft + Bluetooth
  • Android 5 – CyanogenMod 12
  • 2013 – 2015 (broken display)
Oppo Find 5

  • OnePlus One
  • 5.5″ touchscreen with 1080p resolution
  • Qualcomm Snapdragon 801 @ 2.5 Ghz
  • 3 GB RAM
  • 32 GB Flash
  • WLAN n-Draft + Bluetooth
  • CyanogenMod 13
  • 2015 – 2016
  • Apple iPad Mini 2
  • Retina-Display @ 2048×1536
  • Apple A7 SoC @ 1.3 Ghz
  • 1 GB RAM
  • 32 GB Flash
  • WLAN n-Draft + Bluetooth
  • iOS 9.x-11.x
  • 2015 – 2017

etc.

  • IBM NetVista 8364-EXX “IPCop
  • Intel Pentium MMX @ 266 Mhz
  • 256 MB ECC SD-RAM
  • 4 GB CF
  • additional Intel-NIC
  • IPCop 1.4.21, IPCop 1.9.7
  • 2007 – 2009
  • Compaq iPAQ 2.2 – “chat appliance
  • Intel Pentium 3 @ 1 Ghz
  • 256 MB SD-RAM
  • 80 GB IDE HDD
  • Sound card and CD-ROM combo
  • Ubuntu 8.10, ArchLinux
  • 2008 – 2009
  • SUN Ultra 10 – “chat appliance
  • SUN UltraSPARC-IIi @ 333 Mhz
  • 384 MB ECC SD-RAM
  • 20 GB SCSI HDD
  • Sound card and built-in speakers
  • LSI Logic SCSI controller
  • CRUX Linux 2.2 (“We have joy, we have fun, we have Linux on our SUN“)
  • 2008 – 2009 (I really regret selling it!)
  • IBM NetVista 8364-EXX – “chat appliance
  • Intel Pentium MMX @ 266 Mhz
  • 256 MB ECC SD-RAM
  • 4 GB CF card
  • Sound card and built-in speakers
  • USB 1.1, RS232, LPT, S3 Trio 3D VGA card
  • CRUX 2.4
  • 2008 – 2010
  • IBM ThinkCentre S50 “IPCop
  • Intel Celeron D @ 2.4 Ghz
  • 512 MB DDR RAM
  • 20 GB IDE HDD
  • Additional Intel-NIC
  • IPCop 1.4.21, IPCop 1.9.7
  • 2009 – 2010
  • Fujitsu-Siemens S300 – “chat appliance
  • Transmeta 5800 @ 800 Mhz
  • 256 MB DDR RAM
  • 4 GB CF card
  • Fast Ethernet, VGA, sound card
  • Debian Lenny
  • 2010 – 2011
  • ALIX.2D13 – “IPCop
  • AMD Geode LX800 @ 500 Mhz
  • 256 MB DDR RAM
  • 4 GB CF
  • 3x Fast Ethernet + 108 Mbit/s WLAN
  • 2x USB 2.0 + RS232
  • IPCop 2.0.6 (former IPCop 1.4.21)
  • 2010 – 2016
  • ALIX.3C3 – “chat appliance
  • AMD Geode LX800 @ 500 Mhz
  • 256 MB DDR RAM
  • 4 GB CF card
  • 2x miniPCI
  • Fast Ethernet, VGA, Soundkarte
  • Debian Squeeze
  • 2011 – 2012
HTPC
  • D.I.Y. HTPC
  • Intel Atom D525 @ 1.8 Ghz
  • Nvidia ION2
  • 4 GB DDR3 RAM
  • 8 GB SSD
  • Gigabit-Ethernet
  • 8x USB 2.0, USB DVB S card
  • OpenELEC
  • 2011 – 2015
  • ALIX.1D – “RS232-Gateway
  • AMD Geode LX800 @ 500 Mhz
  • 256 MB DDR RAM
  • 4 GB CF
  • Fast Ethernet + 4x USB 2.0 + RS232 + LPT + VGA
  • Tiny Core Linux
  • 2012 – 2013
  • Raspberry Pi B – “web server
  • Broadcom BCM2835 ARM11 CPU @ 700 Mhz
  • 512 MB DDR RAM
  • 8 GB SDHC Class-10
  • Broadcom VideoCore IV, OpenGL 2.0 + 1080p30 GPU
  • Fast Ethernet + HDMI + 2x USB 2.0
  • Debian GNU/Linux 7
  • 2014 – 2015
  • Raspberry Pi B
  • Broadcom BCM2835 ARM11 CPU @ 700 Mhz
  • 256 MB DDR RAM
  • 4 GB SDHC Class-10 + 4 GB USB
  • Broadcom VideoCore IV, OpenGL 2.0 + 1080p30 GPU
  • Fast Ethernet + HDMI + 2x USB 2.0
  • Debian GNU/Linux 7
  • 2014 – 2015
  • Raspberry Pi 2 B – “chat appliance
  • Broadcom BCM2836 Cortex A7 @ 4×900 Mhz
  • 1 GB RAM
  • 16 GB SDHC Class-10
  • Broadcom VideoCore IV, OpenGL 2.0 + 1080p30 GPU
  • Fast Ethernet + HDMI + 4x USB 2.0
  • CentOS 7.x armv7hl
  • 2015 – 2016
  • Raspberry Pi 2 B – “web server
  • Broadcom BCM2836 Cortex A7 @ 4×900 Mhz
  • 1 GB RAM
  • 16 GB SDHC Class-10
  • Broadcom VideoCore IV, OpenGL 2.0 + 1080p30 GPU
  • Fast Ethernet + HDMI + 4x USB 2.0
  • CentOS 7.x armv7hl
  • 2015 – 2016
  • Raspberry Pi 3 B – “HTPC
  • Broadcom BCM2837 Cortex A53 @ 4×1.2 Ghz
  • 1 GB RAM
  • 16 GB SDHC Class-10
  • Broadcom VideoCore IV, OpenGL 2.0 + 1080p30 GPU
  • Fast Ethernet + HDMI + 4x USB 2.0
  • 2015 – 2017

Current hardware

Desktops / Notebooks

Eigenbau Workstation

  • Eigenbau Workstation
  • Intel Xeon 1230v3 “Haswell” @ 3.3 Ghz
  • 8 GB DDR3 RAM (PC-1333), later 16 GB
  • 250 GB SSD + 1 TB SATA HDD @ 5400 RPM
  • MSI GTX760 OC Twin Frozr 2 GB
  • Sound card, PCI-Express, USB 3.0, Gigabit Ethernet
  • Ultra silent
  • Windows 8.1 Professional x64
  • since 2013
  • Apple MacBook Pro (Late 2013)
  • Intel Core i5-4258U “Haswell” @ 2.4 Ghz
  • 13,3 Retina IPS display @ 2560x1600x32
  • 8 GB DDR3L RAM (PC-1600)
  • 256 GB SSD
  • Intel Iris 5100
  • Sound card, USB 3.0, Thunderbolt
  • Bluetooth 4.0, WLAN n-Draft
  • macOS 10.9 – 10.12
  • since 2014

Eingedocktes MacBook Pro

Server

  • HP ProLiant MicroServer Gen8 – “NAS
  • Intel Celeron G1610T @ 2.3 Ghz
  • 4 GB DDR3 RAM (PC-1333)
  • 3x 4 TB SATA HDDs @ 7200 RPM
  • 4x Gigabit Ethernet + IPMI
  • CentOS 7.x
  • since 2016
  • D.I.Y. vSphere cluster (x2)
  • Inter-Tech IPC 2U-2098 case
  • Supermicro X10SDV-TP8F
  • Intel Xeon D-1518 @ 3.2 Ghz
  • 128 GB DDR4 RAM
  • Samsung SSD 960 EVO 250GB NVMe  (vSAN Cache)
  • 480 GB OCZ Trion 150 (vSAN Capacity)
  • 6x Gigabit Ethernet, 2x 10G SFP+, IPMI
  • VMware ESXi 6.5
  • since 2017 Artikel

Mobile

  • Apple iPhone 6S
  • 4.7″ Retina display
  • Apple A9 SoC @ 1.85 Ghz
  • 2 GB RAM
  • 364 GB Flash
  • WLAN n-Draft + Bluetooth
  • iOS 9.x – 11.x
  • since 2016
  • Apple iPad Pro
  • 10.5″ Retina display
  • Apple A10X SoC @ 2.38 Ghz
  • 4 GB RAM
  • 64 GB Flash
  • WLAN n-Draft + Bluetooth
  • iOS 11.x
  • since 2017

etc.

  • NETIO-230A – “PSU
  • 4x 230V Schuko ports
  • Telnet + RS232 + web interface
  • since 2010
  • NETIO-230B – “PSU
  • 4x 230V Schuko ports
  • Telnet + RS232 + web interface
  • since 2012
  • APU.1D4 – “IPFire
  • AMD G T40E @ 1 Ghz
  • 4 GB DDR3 RAM
  • 3x Gigabit Ethernet + 300 Mbit/s WLAN
  • 2x USB 2.0 + RS232
  • IPFire 2.x
  • since 2016 Artikel

Sharing is caring


Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Share on LinkedInShare on XingShare on RedditPrint this pageEmail this to someone

25 comments Write a comment

  1. Pingback: Neu: Hardware-History | /var/pub/chris_blog

  2. Mit nem 486er gestartet – das ja unfassbar – Du Küken!! 😉

    Mein erster Computer war nen Schneider CPC 464 mit Datasette (so einer steht noch im Keller). Der erste (nach dem obligatorischen C64) war dann ein 80286/AT mit rockigen 2MB RAM und 2x 40MB MFM-HDs mit passendem quietschorangenen/bersteinfarbenen Hercules-Monitor (da muss Wikipedia Überstunden schieben, was?). 8 bittiger & 16 bittige ISA Ports erlaubten dann etwas Erweiterung. Achja und das 3.5″ HighDensity Laufwerk (1.44MB) konnte nur 720kb (also DD) – das Board kannte einfach keine “HD” Varianten.

    @WTF Frag mich was bei so Blitzbirnen wie Dir im Kopf abgeht – wenn es Dich nicht interessiert, lies es nicht. Wenn hier einer nen wirklich cooles “Reallife” hat, dann der Autor dieser Texte.

    • Hi Dennis!

      Ja – das stimmt. Alles, was vor C64-Zeiten war, kenne ich nur von Wikipedia. 😀
      MFM habe ich leider noch nicht mal “live” gesehen, ist bestimmt interessant – soetwas “altertümliches” mal in der Hand zu halten. 🙂
      2 MB RAM waren früher in der Tat viel – und heute sind 8/16 GB schon Standard. 😉

      Eine Datasette hab ich leider nie besessen 🙁 Auch für meinen C64 hatte ich “schon gleich” Floppies. Uncool, was? ;-P

      Gruß! 🙂

    • Hi, fkf!

      Hehe, das stimmt wohl – die Clips aus dem Netz hab ich auch schon gesehen.
      Habe das selbst aber nie hinbekommen. Hab mich bei den abertausenden Peek’s und Poke’s wohl an irgendeiner Stelle verschrieben.

      Mein Favorit ist ja “Imperial March” – das klingt richtig gut auf den Floppies. 😀

      Gruß!

  3. Also, was mich ja am meisten wundert ist der »Mac mini« – ich steh ja schon länger auf den ganzen Apple-Kram, aber von dir kamen diesbezüglich nur »vernichtende« Wörter über den »Schrott« 😉

    • Tja, Zeiten ändern sich! 😉
      Prinzipiell bin ich da etwas “offener” geworden – ich nutze das, was ich brauche. Auf dem Desktop läuft daher bei mir Windows, im Server-/Appliance-Umfeld Linux und nebenbei verwende ich noch einige “Exoten”, wie HP-UX, Solaris, OpenVMS oder mittlerweile auch Mac OS X (für mich wirklich exotisch, sowas gab es, wie Du richtig sagst, bei mir noch nie).
      Ich bin nach wie vor kein großer Freund von Apple, was primär an der Firmenpolitik liegt. Da ich mich mit der Programmierung von Smartphone-/Tablet-Apps beschäftige, kommt man da früher oder später nicht um Apple herum.
      Mit dem Mac Mini bin ich recht zufrieden – ein kleines, aber leistungsfähiges und leises Gerät zu halbwegs moderaten Konditionen. Die anderen Produkte sagen mir wenig bis gar nicht zu. Das MBA beispielsweise ist am Formfaktor nicht zu überbieten (bzw. unterbieten) – verfügt aber über fest verlöteten RAM. Da bleibe ich dann doch lieber (was mobile Rechner anbelangt) bei meinen Thinkpads.

      Gruß,
      Christian.

  4. Stimmt schon – gerade bei der Entwicklung von Smartphone- und Tablet-Apps kommt man eigentlich an iOS und somit um Xcode eigentlich nicht rum & dazu wird Mac OS X zur Pflicht.

    Aber, zugetraut hätte ich es dir dennoch nicht – dir hätte ich einen entsprechenden Hackintosh zugetraut.

    Gruß,
    Kai

    • Hehe, ich weiß eben immer wieder zu verwundern. 😛

      Über einen Hackintosh habe ich wirklich auch nachgedacht. Was mich daran abgeschreckt hat, ist die Hardware-Kompatiblität (man kann ja i.d.R. nicht einfach kaufen, was man möchte) und die teilweise recht Mühsame “Frickelei”, bis so ein Hackintosh läuft. Und selbst, wenn er mal läuft, ist es keine Garantie, dass auch alles so läuft, wie es soll.
      Ein Freund von mir hatte einen Hackintosh, der irgendwo einen Bug hatte, der ihm Daten auf einem gemeinsamen Netzlaufwerk (welches vom Hackintosh und einem echten Macintosh verwendet wurde) geschreddert hat. Dieses (wenn auch sehr theoretische) Risiko wollte ich nicht eingehen.
      Für mich hat sich auch nie geklärt, wie sowas rechtlich aussieht – Prinzipiell gestattet Apple die Verwendung von OS X auf dritter Hardware ja nicht.
      Kurzum, wenn schon ein Macintosh, dann wollte ich einen “echten”, bei dem ich nicht noch stundenlang basteln muss, bis er läuft. Da gebrauchte Mac Minis mit Intel Core2Duo oder höher auf eBay recht teuer waren (ein solcher wird ja für Xcode4+ benötigt), habe ich mir gleich einen neuen gekauft. 🙂

      Grüße,
      Christian.

  5. Hallo Christian,

    ich habe mir gerade eine gebrauchte NetIO-230A zugelegt und im Netz einiges über deine App NetDriod gelesen. Leider kann ich diese aber nirgends finden. Ich würde mich sehr freuen, wenn du mir eventuell die App bzw. einen entsprechenden Link schicken könntest.

    Vielen Dank
    Jens

  6. Hallo, das nänne ich mal ausführlich! genau das was ich gesucht habe! Habe noch etwas im net gefunden aber da geht es eher um Grafikkarten Ranglisten ist aber auch einiges über die Geschichte gefunden. MfG rafa

  7. Hi Christian, wirklich beeindruckende Chronik. Das nenne ich technikaffin. Wünsche weiterhin viel Erfolg mit deinem Blog!

  8. Hey Christian!

    Was für eine großartige Liste.
    Ich habe so viele Maschinen aus meinem Werdegang wiedererkannt – Netvista, iPaQ, alles was einfach möglichst klein war wurde missbraucht 🙂

    Grüße aus OS.
    PAtrick

    • Hey Patrick!
      Vielen Dank für die Blumen! 🙂

      Ja, die NetVista- und iPaq-Maschinen waren seinerzeit grandios. *in Erinnerungen schwelg*
      Für was hast Du sie denn verwendet?

      Beste Grüße aus Hessen,
      Christian!

      • Hey Christian,

        puh – ich glaube beide damals wegen niedriger Stromaufnahme und passiver Kühlung angeschafft. Der Netvista war mit seiner CF Karte lange ein kleiner 0-8-15 Webserver auf Debian Basis und der iPaQ mit zusätzlicher PCI NIC dann irgendwann mal als Firewall/Homeserver.

  9. Gude,

    Intel Xeon 1230v3 „Ivy-Bridge“ … vielleicht eher nen v2? 😉 v3 ist Haswell

Leave a Reply